Film and Digital

My new hybrid workflow is now in full swing. This is something I have wanted to really nail down for some time now. Although I am not a pixel peeper, the final outcome of my image is of course very important. Having tools that will get me to that point are of equal importance to me. Although I do not buy the best of anything, I make sure that I have the right set of tools to execute images the way I want to. I do not feel that there is a best medium for photography, rather the best medium for the desired outcome of each individual frame.

I am, by my own admission, crap at landscapes. So I thought for this test I would compare how the different mediums can photograph the same subject matter.

My current work is based around shooting families who want something a bit different as well as bands, solo artists, writers, painters and comedians. Basically anyone! I like to add my own stamp to each image I take, making sure people know that I took it. And a big part of this is my medium format film work.

Below you will find a selection of images taken on three different cameras.

.

.

.

My Bronica ETRS is my go-to portrait camera. Especially with Portra 400, 160 and Ilford HP5+

www.scottchoucino.com

.

This is my latest camera purchase. It is a Holga from HongKong. Although I could get pretty close to the final image in photoshop, I like the more tangible workflow.

www.scottchoucino.com-17

.

Example of a dreamy and soft image from my Holga shot on Fuji 400 pro film that was 7 years out of date, I removed the frame guide inside the camera which makes it a bit wavey around the edges of the frame.

www.scottchoucino.com-4

.

I scan my negatives and transparencies on an Epson V500 with some anti reflection glass holding them flat. I got the glass for a few £ from the frame builders in the basement of Leicester Peoples Photographic Gallery.

www.scottchoucino.com (7 of 7)

.

Digital

www.scottchoucino.com-3

.

Fuju Velvia 100F scanned with Epson’s Frame holder (This is my favorite final image of the lot)
www.scottchoucino.com

.

Fuji 100F scanned directly onto the glass with a home made frame holder (some sharpness is lost due to the scanners DOF)www.scottchoucino.com-7

.

The same image taken on the Holga with expired Fujo 400 pro C41www.scottchoucino.com-5

.

Scanned straight on the glass from the Bronica ETRSwww.scottchoucino.com-6

.

Scanned using the Epson Frame holders and I added a bit more to the shadows, the gradient is from a  filter rather than in post.www.scottchoucino.com-3

.

Taken with a canon 5D and a 50mm 1.4 lens

www.scottchoucino.com-2

.

Bronica Fuji Veliva 100F scanned using the negative carriers Epson provided
www.scottchoucino.com-2

.

Shot on a canon 50D with the Sigma 18-50 2.8 lens.

www.scottchoucino.com

.

.

So, what we have here are four different ways of taking an image (not including different scan and post process methods)

A canon 5D + 50mm lens that cost me £800 used

Canon 50D + 18-50 lens that was £700 used

Bronica ETRS with 75mm lens £250 used

Holga camera £20 brand new

A vast differnece in price, spec and formats ( 1.6 crop, full frame, 645 and 6×6) which all give VERY different images. I am not sure I could say that one is better than the other. But between the selection of tools, it allows me to create different final images.

I am useless at landscape photography, but if you click HERE then you can see how I have utilised these techniques with my portrait work.

 

 

 

 

Posted on: April 1, 2013